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Kirstie is just so annoying at times, isn’t she? How can she not know her best friend Jeannie loves her to pieces? She hangs on her every word and doesn’t dare to criticise her even when she makes a fool of herself by marrying way beneath her station. Mind you, Kirstie is not the only annoying woman round here. I can be pretty annoying myself, especially when I persist in making life complicated for my poor long-suffering characters. I can’t help it though – it goes with the territory. Well? Life is complicated. It was for me anyway…

A highland wedding is an unusual start for a lesfic novel, I grant you, but all is never as it first seems, I promise. Kirstie proves an easy target for a silver-tongued and handsome young Highlander despite the obvious class difference between them and the hard life that lies ahead for her as a crofter’s wife. It was all an innocent and romantic dream for the lass. But marrying a Jacobite? What on earth possessed her to do that? Was she rebelling against her strict Protestant father? Did she already suspect that her wicked Uncle Malcolm might have secret plans for her at that point? Who knows?

Our pretty highland lassie certainly doesn’t have a clue and yet Jeannie stands by the girl she loves through thick and thin, tolerating verbal abuse and emotional ignorance and constantly hiding her feelings. Jeannie isn’t destroyed by her unrequited love though and she is nobody’s fool either. Kirstie on the other hand seems totally unaware of the havoc she is causing in Jeannie’s life. What an unholy mess! Here we have Robbie destroyed by Angus’s insane jealousy; Kirstie destroyed by Robbie’s foolhardiness; Jeannie wounded by Kirstie’s lack of understanding and Angus devastated by Jeannie’s rejection. All this is set against a historically accurate background of politics and intrigue, war and genocide. How will it all end? You will have to read A Crofter’s Tale to find out. Please do – it’s free with Kindle Unlimited.

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A writer is a dreamer who needs space to dream and sometimes the reality of modern day publishing gets in the way. This is true whether one is self-published or published by one of the very many small presses that specialise in particular genres. These days an author constantly needs to push their own agenda, recommend their own books and those of their associates, attend conferences and conventions and be an expert social mover and shaker. Every day I see examples of excellent but introverted writers struggling constantly while the more pushy ones squeeze them out. Whether it is done consciously or unconsciously I honestly do not know but writers do tend to run in packs. My Twitter pack is a multi-genre pack full of generous and sensitive individuals who are non-judgemental, not genre or publisher biased, and share each other’s posts. I am so glad of it. Without my pack on Twitter I could so easily drown. As it is I can barely keep my head out of the water.

Now in some respects I am a little bit of a rarity amongst writers. Not because I am some sort of special snowflake (I know my limitations and they are Legion), or because I am a multi-genre and cross-genre perpetrator (lots of writers are), and not even because I am also a musician (although it is hard to serve two Muses) but because I put my own name on everything I do. Yes, that’s right. My name. I don’t hide my gender behind vague initials or change my name from book to book in case somebody who enjoys one title hates another and feels betrayed. I am not ashamed to be a poet, to write scifi, horror and romance, to include sweet romance and honest steamy sex scenes, I have a mix of LGBT and straight. I am not ashamed of my music either. It is a part of my soul. I write because I feel driven to and I compose for the very same reason.

Despite all that, I am still an introvert and a neurodiverse one at that, being mildly autistic. I hate social occasions. I can only cope in small gatherings unless I am deliberately putting on a show. Then character takes over. It just doesn’t feel comfortable to move around a room pressing hands and making small talk. My best friends and the people I talk to most are my cats. My wildest parties are held on Twitter; openly, in the morning with the news or Victoria Live on the TV or in the evening with Star Trek reruns, my favourite one-starred disaster movies, Casualty or Holby City. I confess I am a bit of a geek. I enjoy science – one of my short stories actually opens with a description of an atomic explosion – and I love doing the research for my stories. It doesn’t all go in of course but I probably err on the side of too much at times.

I don’t really know why I am writing this post except that I do wish self-promotion wasn’t such a “thing” in this world we live in – especially in the arts – schmoozing should not be the artist’s most important weapon but I know I am fighting a lost cause. I do wish readers were the ones to propose books for awards, not authors, and that readers would vote for them, not authors but again, why should they? It is not the norm. It probably never was. OK, I will go back to my lair and hide away for a bit longer; then there’s a grain-free cake to bake, cats to feed and a happy life to live. Have a beautiful day.

This is a post that has been decades in the making. In my lifetime equality issues have made huge strides to the extent that gay and lesbian friends are very much out and part of everyday life. I am less sure about how those friends who are transsexual feel and to be honest the extent of biphobia and bi-erasure from those who should know better never ceases to amaze me. I decided quite early in my writing career to follow the principle that “love just is” and I have never excluded relationships that I felt were germane to the characters in a story. For this reason, I believe I am struggling to find any sort of audience. There are those who would say to me something along these lines:

1. “I can’t buy / read / share your WW2 novel because it has women like that in it.”

2. “Why does everything have to contain lesbians or gays these days?”

3. “There never used to be so many of them. The world is becoming so wicked.”

On the other hand, I also get:

1. “Why did Midge have to marry a man before she discovered herself?”

2. “I wish there were no straight sex scenes in your novel, you know. Without those is would be really good.”

3. “Why did your story have so many men in it? Was that really necessary?”

To me, neither of these attitudes addresses the real problem of bi-erasure, straight-erasure or the LGBT-erasure we (wrongly) assume is over and done with. People who buy books want to look through rose tinted spectacles at a world where any of the following apply:

1. LGBTQIA people do not exist; or only exist on the periphery as sad or comic characters.

2. Men in lesfic – or women in M/M romance – do not play any role in the story, other than a minor part if absolutely necessary.

3. Characters are exclusively gay, lesbian or straight, nobody is ever confused and bisexuality is a wicked perversion that endangers everyone who is actually honest with themselves.

Sadly, my books do not conform to these straitjacketing norms and for that reason I now know that they will probably not be enjoyed by many readers, LGBTQIA or straight, within my lifetime. I have worked so hard over the last five years or so and yet I am still very much on the fringe and at this point in time I am seriously thinking of giving up creative writing altogether and going back to the less frustrating business of composing music.

You know, in my stories, I try my best to make the love scenes open, honest and tasteful; please note I said love. I am not in the business of writing erotica; too many people already do it far better than I ever could. I would just like to find a few more tolerant and open-minded readers who don’t fall into either of the above two categories though. I would like to find some readers who can accept that LGBT characters existed and had (albeit closeted) normal lives before 1970 and others who can accept that their own liberation includes recognising that we are not stereotypes. Real people are not all the same – black or white, hetero-exclusive or homo-exclusive, recognisable genre tropes in day to day existence – nor should we be. My relationships are not second class relationships, either in real life or between the pages of my novels.

Rant over.

Love just is.

The battle of Culloden lies at the very heart of A Crofter’s Tale , literally as well as metaphorically. It is a vital plot driver and takes up a whole chapter of the novel. Why is this? When writing the novel, I was torn between giving too much detail (history) and too little (romance). For some romance writers it might have been enough to give a paragraph or two’s description of the carnage and Robbie’s escape and to ignore the various political and personal dramas that actually destroyed the Jacobites. It is very easy to blame the Duke of Cumberland’s brutality or the inept leadership of Charles Edward Stuart too. That is fairly standard.

The reality is much more complex though. This disaster would not have happened had the Prince trusted his most senior general, Lord George Murray, and it would not have happened had negative political manipulation not been going on in the background. I believe the defeat at Culloden was a natural result of plotting and power play behind the scenes and for this reason, using dialogue and quotes from the time, I have shown it in A Crofter’s Tale . Rejecting Lord George Murray’s advice ultimately led to the massacre and the atrocities that followed. In my opinion Culloden need not have happened at all and, even if it did have to happen, there were serious but avoidable errors in choosing the field of battle and preparing for Cumberland’s forces. The American people have given us the best possible word for it: Culloden was a clusterfuck.

If you have ever stood on Culloden Moor and experienced the emptiness of the place or visited the visitors’ centre and seen the battle brought to life in front of your eyes you will understand that dilemma. This was the one event that turned the 1745 rebellion into a tragedy that brought about genocide in the highlands and lives on in the hearts and minds of anyone with Scots ancestry. I agonised for months over this chapter, how much to give and how much to withhold and if I erred on the side of history rather than romance I apologise now. Time will tell.

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In 1978 my father decided on a family move to the Scottish highlands. My sister and I were at University by then and so the disruption was to be fairly minimal. I lost touch with a few school friends but that was because I failed to keep in touch. I did not enjoy writing letters and was a little phone-phobic so I lived in the present, as I always had done in the past as an RAF brat, and just made new friends. It did mean that vacations involved a long train journey home of course but Scotland proved a wonderful place. I took long walks in the forest, swam in the Spey and worked part-time in a local hotel and in my father’s shop. We were regulars on the Whisky Trail and after so many talks on how whisky is made I feel I could nearly build my own distillery. The prize for listening was always a wee dram at the end and I grew fond of malt whisky, particularly the Spey malts which are mild, warm and fruity rather than sweet, smoky and peaty like the Islay malts my late father loved.

Anyway, I digress (because I like whisky so much). From being a little put out at the move, I became very fond of our new home and I can smell the clean air to this day in my memory. If you have never been to the Scottish highlands and you prefer wide open spaces to clubbing and city excitement, do go there please. You will love it. It must have made quite an impression on me as I found myself returning there again and again in my mind’s eye as I wrote A Crofter’s Tale. This started as a short story, written following a request from Jewels some twelve years ago. Looking back on it, it was a sweet little story but I lacked the confidence to make much more of it at the time.

Now, having published one not particularly great novel (that seems to be either loved or detested) and another more middle of the road novel that I am actually quite proud of, it seemed it was time to take the original story to its conclusion and I worked very hard on it. I researched the Jacobite Memoirs to learn about the rebellion from first source and I read a biography of the Duke of Cumberland for balance. I steeped myself in the Victorian genre too because I wanted an antiquated eighteenth century feel to the language.

Meanwhile the original story line expanded to include a truly black-hearted villain and also the political intrigues that led to Bonnie Prince Charlie’s downfall and the dreadful aftermath of Culloden. (Drummossie Moor is one of those places you won’t forget easily, by the way. It is so empty and bleak even now. I stood there and felt I could almost hear the screams of the massacred men. I wouldn’t want to spend a night alone there and remembered my father saying how Belsen had encroached on him in a similar way in the 1950s – a bleak place, where even the birds refused to sing). So, I approached the historical scenes with an eye to accuracy, using descriptions of the times wherever I could, particularly with Lord George Murray. For some, that might be dry but I found it necessary to understand the times and the events better.

There is nothing new in any of that of course but one thing struck me in my reading that I felt I needed to address. That is the issue of stereotypes. My story is different because it has a lesbian romance at its heart but that is not the only difference. I wanted to build on characters and on a way of life now lost to us. I wanted to have earthy, ordinary characters. The original Jacobite novels and the modern highlander take-offs I have read usually have big similarities – they focus on the rich, noble and powerful players in life and ordinary people, if they do appear at all, tend to be rogues or beggars who speak in unintelligible dialect. You won’t find much of that in A Crofter’s Tale. They speak more eloquently than we do because the 18th century was a time when most people did speak well. There is a tiny bit of Gaelic and a few expressions common in Scots English but apart from the Burns poem I quote at the beginning there is no heavy dialect.

Anyway, A Crofter’s Tale is out there in the wild, yours for the taking so to speak. You can read it for free on Kindle Unlimited, it’s on Kindle and published also in a clear print paperback edition. I hope you do give it a chance and I hope you will enjoy it.

I must confess, I never thought about genre as a simple reader. I just looked at the cover and the subject matter of a book in a store and I bought it if I thought I might enjoy it. This is something I have done thoughout my book buying life and it also applies to books I now buy on kindle. I have a leaning towards the scientific, the bizarre, the unusual and the historic so things like generic romance or chick lit were never really on my radar until I joined Goodreads.

At that point I discovered two things, the existence of something called genre fiction which dominates publishing and the Goodreads Giveaway which allowed me to explore new writers at no cost. I won and subsequently read and reviewed several books that I admit would not have jumped off the shelves into my shopping basket. I also participated in discussions about genre fiction versus literary fiction and some of these were very heated. I learned about sensitivity readers and tropes. These were things I had never known about before, despite having studied English Literature.

Now at this point I must declare an interest as a writer and also that I am the victim of a British Grammar School education that was steeped in classics from Chaucer to the 1960s. My interests may have been a little different, but the standards I was held to had very little to do with genres or tropes. Times change, standards change and people change; I now read books that are certainly not classic literature and I read for reasons other than either study or pure pleasure. I still enjoy books that are different though.

My attitude towards books is similar to my attitude towards food and music. I will try it once and, if I like it, I may well add it to my list of things I must do again. Having said that, I am not a fan of the safe or the predictable and this is why I find genre fiction difficult to cope with. I want to be surprised and delighted and tropes do neither for me. In films the prevalence of tropes is something that is a real turn off for me. I no longer enjoy sci-fi or horror for example. I used to, and I still relish old films when they come on the television – especially 1950s sci-fi and Hammer horror – but the problem remains that I absolutely KNOW what modern “heroes” will look like, behave like, talk like and often it is not at all to my taste. I also know who will die horribly, in what order and that we are all in a real mess if this is how people would behave in real life. I guess I am just an old-fashioned girl, right? For me as a potential film goer, the ability to shock and amaze has now disappeared from an industry that now just believes in gore, swear words, more gore, camera shake, fast cuts, more gore, more camera shake and those over-riding stereotypes.

I am not advocating any return to “the good old days”, but I am starting to feel like a “missing link” between the 18th century and the 1990s. Bear that in mind if you read any of my books. They will contain ideas that are not safe, sexuality is neither censored nor packaged to appeal to only one type of reader, my people do not conform to tropes and their behaviour is not easily pigeon-holed. By today’s standards, this is bad writing. By my standards it is honesty. I write badly because in my experience life is usually lived badly, without censorship, without a safety net and without a label.

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In late October this year I became interested in following no grain diets due to serious health issues. Being hypertensive, diabetic and starting to experience bloating and brain fog was a wake up call and I discovered Grain Brain by Dr David Perlmutter and Wheatbelly by Dr William Davis. The science in Wheatbelly read true and so I immediately decided to try the low-carb no grain approach. I didn’t find it particularly difficult since I can’t eat potatoes and have never much enjoyed pasta, rice or sugary things. I took it on faith that eating the foods recommended would lead to some weight loss and I was right.

Along the way, I reviewed Dr Davis’s book on Goodreads and gave him a very favourable review. Due to the viral nature of Goodreads, a friend of mine then suggested I join his Facebook Group and I gladly applied. At first this was great. People offered mutual support and shared recipes, as I did myself. When I managed to get my HbA1c results down to normal in three months I posted that too. I was very happy and wanted to share my good news in the group.

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Then I suffered another flare up of tendon trouble in my right hand. I had been quite foolish in late November early December. I was trying to get the log cabin project finished in case my sister wanted to stay over (she is allergic to my cats) and I spent a lot of time out in the cold using power tools to sand and polish some old pine furniture. That was the point at which the pain started and the tendon began to click. I would wake in the morning unable to straighten my ring finger on my right hand and the pain was excruciating.

The group had been so warm and friendly that I made a brief post basically saying that I was having a serious problem with RSI and trigger finger due to overuse of power tools when doing DIY and did anyone have a suggestion as to possible dietary treatments. Four very kind people responded with suggestions which I acknowledged with a like. Then the post was deleted without explanation.

I could not understand what was wrong here until somebody slipped me the word that DIY in the USA is not quite as innocent as DIY in the UK and that power tools might be misinterpreted as something altogether more seedy. I rephrased the post and many people again responded including one of the group administrators who said she certainly had not deleted any of my posts but maybe one of the other women or Dr Davis had. Next thing I know is that I have no more notifications from the group; puzzled by this, I searched for the page and got an access denied message. I asked a friend of mine if the group still existed. She said it did but I had disappeared from the members list along with all my posts. Hello! I was blocked.

Now I am no teenage troll and I find it very upsetting to have been thrown out of this support network without word of explanation from anyone. This is seriously spineless behaviour. I followed all the rules, I bought the books, followed the diet, behaved politely at all times, was never negative or rude, didn’t ask stupid questions, tried to support new members and now I was banned for reasons unknown. (Or rather, for reasons I suspect that are baseless and silly in the extreme). If I am correct in my suspicions then somebody needs to get their mind out of the gutter and whilst I seriously advocate the low-carb grain-free approach if you want to turn your life around, and whilst I still stand by the good reviews I have given Dr Davis’s books on Goodreads, I cannot recommend that anyone join his Facebook groups to be insulted and emotionally abused in this way by persons unknown.

I seriously hope that Dr Davis gets his house in order and sorts out whoever is responsible for this unacceptable and cruel behaviour towards somebody who needed help and was a good group member, contributing and showing support to others. If he does not, then I would question his sincerity. That is the reason for this very public blog post. Be careful. The truth is out there!