How to use social media


I spend a lot of time on Twitter. Possibly (very likely) more than I should and that is possibly counterproductive in terms of time management, but I have grown my following by being real and interactive. Occasionally I am tempted to schedule tweets and I do find they can be effective for reaching people in the middle of the night. If I do, I always respond to follows and retweets as soon as I can.

Lately I have been seeing a lot of relatively small accounts growing their own followers by offering random retweets and telling you this is the way to go. It is almost like a follow train (another thing I won’t do) and while still within the rules it is only a matter of time before Twitter reacts to it and makes it harder to do. Already it is impossible to access your own likes for pinning to your profile later, you used to be able to keep them for years, now the limit is days. Favourites have been replaced by “moments” and I am not even sure what “moments” are. (Perhaps someone who is a real person can tell me in the comments?) That has been done for a reason, most likely to stop automation of this sort. It is very annoying when measures taken to discourage automation stop the user from sending real messages that quote your own old tweets… but there you go… It is the price we pay for these cheating Autotweet apps.

I know lots of people who used to interact personally and reciprocate RTs are now using random apps instead of spending time on Twitter. They no longer respond or reciprocate so I no longer retweet them. In my limited time I want to interact with real people, not be overlooked by third party apps. So, that is my curmudgeonly musing for the day. If you ARE a new retweet app user you are losing the impressions my RTs would have given you. I prefer the real deal!

I spend a lot of time on Twitter. I always have. Twitter has an intellectual beauty and simplicity that speaks to me and has none of the artificial, ad revenue induced limitations of Facebook. If you want your content to reach a lot of people then judicious use of hashtags and pinned tweets will do just that. It is also annoyingly possible for people to list you and read content without having to follow anybody at all. This one-sidedness of Twitter seems a little hard-bitten to me. Usually if somebody follows me, I will follow them back if they seem reasonable. I don’t then un-follow them. Having said that, there are some folks who can’t abide clutter and a busy Twitter stream can appear very cluttered indeed. There are those people who don’t follow anyone at all, yet seem to have followers and do frequently re-tweet what you post. They achieve that using their own curated lists and hashtags in case you wondered. I follow a lot of people because I consider it common courtesy to follow back but I don’t follow everybody and in today’s blog post I want to deal with that first; in other words, when a follow on Twitter is not appropriate, when to mute and when to block.

Let’s take the no follow option first. I see increasingly numbers of people with an “egg” for a profile picture, no personal details and no tweets displayed on their profile. There are two main reasons for this. The first and most innocent reason is that they are new to Twitter – and we were all newbies once so you will see 5-10% follow-back on these profiles. The second reason (and the reason I will now not follow an empty or light profile) is that some of these people are scammers operating below the radar using lists and direct messages. Follow them and you will immediately receive a message asking you for an action that involves sharing something. Whether that something is money, assistance or information, these empty profiles are on the make. This is the realm of the beggar, the hacker or the 419 scam. I avoid them.

Some people will post an attractive picture, possibly of themselves but usually of a model or minor celeb, then they attract followers by posting and reposting the useless “trash” that clutters timelines. These posts are usually click-bait, badly spun articles on interesting themes that send you away to ads that often refuse to switch off. You are downloading malware at that point. This is a good point at which to use the “mute” function. You can mute someone who posts trashy or suspect content that clogs up the flow but there will always be someone else who innocently reposts it because it looks fun. That is the nature of click-bait and here is where the “block” function is very useful. Just please make sure you are blocking the right account or you will continue to receive trashy posts from other friends and followers. It is the original person you need to block, even if you are not following them, because you are getting the rubbish second-hand.

There is a much more annoying use of the “block” function. Some people on Twitter are plainly self-important, rude and selfish. They will follow you, then un-follow when you follow back. You may not know unless you use an un-follower app like who.unfollowed.me on Twitter. If you do and you un-follow then re-follow them thinking they made a mistake they will block you. I know, somebody in my circle of friends has done that to me years ago. I have never had an unpleasant dialogue with him and in fact I have no idea why he should have blocked me all those years ago except that I re-followed him. What a gutless thing to do! There was never a cross word exchanged, no spam involved and it is a total mystery to me, but he does have a LOT of followers. How do I know about this unreasonable action? You are notified if someone has blocked you if you ever visit their profile. That means you can’t read their stuff and they don’t have to see yours. It is a blunt but savage weapon that some “people collectors” use freely. They are important celebrities in their own little bubble and you are not. Annoy them with a re-follow and they will sting you hard using a function that is meant to protect. I know, and I am not impressed, in fact I blocked him back only this week.

So when should you use “block”? I use it on empty profiles that I find frightening. I am not prepared to elaborate on that one much, but I don’t want to be listed and possibly stalked by people whose tweets I can’t read. There are some dangerous groups out there. You will know them by their followers and possibly who else they are following – I always check it out. I also use “block” on people who spread hardcore porn on unconnected hashtags. I don’t usually see much porn in my stream and what I do see I generally just ignore, but there are a lot of apparently Russian porn accounts set up with English sounding names. These routinely tag “adult” pictures with proven successful hashtags that guarantee RTs – often from groups of writers, musicians, sportsmen and artists who use automatic programs to grow a following. Of course you also have the choice to report but the report options are limited and the nearest to hashtag abuse is “spam”.

The other use I make of “block” is for foul language related to hate speech and incitement to violence. I don’t mind people who disagree with me, I will interact with anyone politely, but when I see rudeness, disrespect or hate speech I hit the “block” button. I don’t use it too much because it can lead to account reviews and suspension of an individual. Just because you don’t like someone doesn’t mean they deserve a ban but nor do you have to endure viciousness. How you use Twitter is your own affair. It is a valuable tool for communication and, let’s face it, that’s why we all sign up. If you choose to be interactive you can make lots of friends and enjoy the experience. Thank you for reading. Have fun but be safe!